Living Values Education Activities for Street Children

Living Values Education Activities for Street Children Ages 3-6, 7-10 and 11-14

These three resources contain adapted Living Values Education Activities on peace, respect, love and cooperation and a series of stories about a street-children family. The stories serve as a medium to educate about and discuss issues related to domestic violence, death, AIDS, drug sellers, drugs, sexual abuse and physical abuse. The issues of begging, being scared when adults argue, safety, being safe from unsafe adults, sex, being scared at night and wanting to learn are also addressed.

 

Activities for Street Children

 

The 70 lessons in the Living Values Education Activities for Street Children 3-6 book include discussions, activities, and the development of positive adaptive social and emotional skills and protective social skills. In addition to the issues just mentioned, the 77 activities in the Living Values Education Activities for Street Children 7-10 book also address caring for younger siblings, eating in a healthy way, cleanliness, lack of food, stealing, the effects of drugs and the right to education. The 80 Living Values Education Activities for Street Children 11-14 activities, in addition to the above, addresses female and male maturation, prostitution, sex trafficking, labor trafficking, corruption, eating in a healthy way and hygiene. The issues of the risk of dying quickly from diarrhoea, cycles of violence versus non-violence, child rights and making a difference are also addressed.

 

Activities for Street Children

 

The materials also include suggestions for greater community involvement in the area of vocational training as well as educating the community about AIDS and other relevant issues through dramas/ skits.

At-Risk Living Values Education Workshops for educators working with: Living Values Education Training for Street Children

Living Values Education offers a special training to street educators and agencies caring for street children.

 

Participants engage in a conflict resolution role-play
Participants engage in a conflict resolution role-play during an Living Values Education Activities for Street Children Training in Indonesia, November 2002.

 

This training incorporates the elements of the regular Living Values Education Educator Workshop and adds sessions to build skills and do the activities particular to this special unit.

 

Fred and Katie began walking toward the big tree in the alley.

Fred and Katie began walking toward the big tree in the alley. Fred held Katie's hand.
Illustration by Joanne Corcoran

 

These materials contain adapted living values activities on peace, respect, love and cooperation and a series of stories about a street children family. The stories serve as a medium to educate about and to discuss issues related to domestic violence, death, AIDS, drug sellers, drugs, sexual abuse and physical abuse. The stories are combined with discussions, activities, and the development of positive adaptive social and emotional skills. This training is a minimum of six days.

 

...Fred and Katie began walking toward the big tree in the alley ...
And then, continued Mama, when you want to get out of the ball you can't, because your body and mind only want the drug.

 

Read more about Living Values Education’s programme for children in difficult circumstances – Living Values Education Activities for Street Children

Read about a recent research study in Paraguay, implementing Living Values Education Activities for Street Children with hundreds of children and outstanding results.

Results with Street Children

The Living Values Education programme for street children is bringing in very positive reports.  In Brazil, incarcerated youth that had been so violent that they were housed separately were able to return to the regular setting after three months of the Living Values Education Activities for Street Children materials. They were much more peaceful and compliant with authority.  Other street children who were attending a government educational facility were able to obtain a regular job; others were able to learn to care for their children in a nurturing way.